Hydrogen Production of the Past

The most common method of producing hydrogen is steam methane reforming, using natural gas or coal as a feedstock. Reforming consumes methane gas and emits substantial amounts of CO2 (50 + tons per day). Substantial CO2 production from reforming limits its expansion and adds uncertain regulatory constraints and cost penalties in the future. These facilities are located near gas supplies and therefore require significant transportation infrastructure or piping to get the hydrogen to a customer’s site.

 

Electrolysis uses DC power to break water into hydrogen and oxygen. The conventional electrolysis process is enhanced by adding KOH (Lye), a toxic material. Conventional electrolysis devices are made of stacks of “cells” in series (100s to 1000s). These cells are made up of platinum and expensive membranes.

HydroStar's HERO for the Now and the Future

HydroStar's HERO technology uses a proprietary electrolyte called B9 that is safe and clean and replaces the caustic and toxic alternative.  This allows HydroStar to build simple, low capital cost and low operating cost systems to produce hydrogen on-site.  No CO2 issues; no unsafe electrolytes; no transportation to the customer requirements.  Safe, clean, on-site production of hydrogen using low cost power when available.

When There's Excess Power

Excess power comes from many sources and often is lost or uncaptured resulting is wasted energy. 

  • Renewable power doesn’t always happen when there is demand for it; often it happens when there’s lower demand for power.
  • Spring time hydro-electric runoff is often lost or wasted in "spill" energy that can't be captured.
  • Night time grid power demand is generally lower and therefore requires grid balancing through reducing power to the grid or otherwise wasting already created power

HydroStar's HERO hydrogen production system can plug into any of these sources and provide methods of capturing these excess power situations with green hydrogen for use in many different applications.